Automatically generate PKI certificates with Vault

A while a go I wrote an item on how to setup a secure Vault with Consul as backend and its time to do something with Vault again. With this blogpost we will setup Vault with the PKI backend. With the PKI backend we can generate or revoke short lived ssl certificates with Vault.

The goal with this blogpost is that we create intermediate CA certificate, configure Vault and generate certificates via the cmd line and via the API. The reason we use intermediate CA certificate is that if something might happen with the certificate/key, its much easier to revoke it and recreate a new intermediate certificate. If this would happen with the actual ROOT CA, you’ll have a troubles and work to fix it again. So keep the ROOT CA files on a safe place!

Preparations

We will create an intermediate certificate that Vault will be using to create and sign certificate requests. We have to create a new key and the certificate needs to be signed by the ROOT CA. First we create the key:

openssl genrsa -out private/intermediate_ca.key.pem 4096

And now we need to create a certificate signing request:

openssl req -config intermediate/openssl.cnf -new -sha256 \
-key private/intermediate_ca.key.pem -out \
csr/intermediate_ca.csr.pem

We have to make sure that we fill in the same information as the original CA, but in this case we use a slightly different Organisation Unit name so we know/verify that a certificate is signed by this intermediate CA instance. Once we filled in all data, we have to sign it with the ROOT CA to create the actual certificate:

openssl ca -keyfile private/cakey.pem -cert \
dj-wasabi.local.pem -extensions v3_ca -notext -md \
sha256 -in csr/intermediate_ca.csr.pem -out \
certs/intermediate_ca.crt.pem
Using configuration from /etc/pki/tls/openssl.cnf
Check that the request matches the signature
Signature ok
Certificate Details:
        Serial Number: 18268543712502854739 (0xfd86e7b7336db453)
        Validity
            Not Before: Aug 23 13:56:08 2017 GMT
            Not After : Aug 21 13:56:08 2027 GMT
        Subject:
            countryName               = NL
            stateOrProvinceName       = Utrecht
            organizationName          = dj-wasabi
            organizationalUnitName    = Vault CA
            commonName                = dj-wasabi.local
            emailAddress              = ikben@werner-dijkerman.nl
        X509v3 extensions:
            X509v3 Subject Key Identifier: 
                93:46:3D:69:24:32:C7:11:C4:B7:27:66:89:67:FB:1F:8E:1B:50:97
            X509v3 Authority Key Identifier: 
                keyid:60:63:7E:0F:54:5E:7D:A5:37:A8:6F:BD:27:BF:73:15:56:B2:89:31

            X509v3 Basic Constraints: 
                CA:TRUE
Certificate is to be certified until Aug 21 13:56:08 2027 GMT (3650 days)
Sign the certificate? [y/n]:y

1 out of 1 certificate requests certified, commit? [y/n]y
Write out database with 1 new entries
Data Base Update

With the -keyfile and -cert we provide the key and crt file of the root CA to sign the new intermediate ssl certificate. Ok, 10 years might be a little bit to long, but this is just for my local environment and my setup probably won’t last that long. 🙂

We are almost done with the preparations and one thing we need to do before we go configuring Vault. We have to combine both the CA certificates and the intermediate private key into a single file, before we can upload it to Vault.

cat certs/intermediate_ca.crt.pem dj-wasabi.local.pem \
private/intermediate_ca.key.pem > certs/ca_bundle.pem

First we print the contents of the newly created crt file, then the ROOT ca crt file and as last the intermediate private key and place that all in a single file called ca_bundle.pem.

Vault

Now we are ready to continue with the Vault part. We open a terminal to the host/container running Vault and before we can do somehting, we have to authenticate ourself first. I use the root token for authenticating:

export VAULT_TOKEN=<_my_root_token_>

The pki backend is disabled at default so we have to enabled it before we can use it. You can enable it multiple times, each enabled backend can be used for a specific domain. In this post we only use one domain, but lets pretend we need to create a lot more after this so we don’t use “defaults” in paths and naming.

We will mount the pki plugin for the dj-wasabi.local domain, so lets use the path: dj-wasabi. We give it a small description and then we specify the pki backend and then hit enter.

vault mount -path=dj-wasabi -description="dj-wasabi Vault CA" pki

There are some more options we don’t use for now with this example but maybe you want some more control for it, you can see them by executing the command: vault mount –help.
We can verify that we have mounted the pki backend by executing the vault mounts command:

bash-4.3$ vault mounts
Path        Type       Accessor            Plugin  Default TTL  Max TTL    Force No Cache  Replication Behavior  Description
cubbyhole/  cubbyhole  cubbyhole_2540c354  n/a     n/a          n/a        false           local                 per-token private secret storage
dj-wasabi/  pki        pki_6e5dc562        n/a     system       system     false           replicated            dj-wasabi Vault CA
secret/     generic    generic_fb0527dd    n/a     system       system     false           replicated            generic secret storage
sys/        system     system_347beff9     n/a     n/a          n/a        false           replicated            system endpoints used for control, policy and debugging

Now its time to upload the intermediate bundle file. I have temporarily placed the file in the config directory of Vault (Its a host mount, so it was easier to copy the file to the container) and now we have to upload it to our dj-wasabi backend. We have to upload our ca bundle file into the path we earlier used to mount the pki backend: <mount_path>/config/ca, in my case it is dj-wasabi/config/ca:

vault write dj-wasabi/config/ca \
pem_bundle="@/vault/config/ca_bundle.pem"
Success! Data written to: dj-wasabi/config/ca

If you get an error now, it probably means something went wrong with either creating the ca bundle file or validating the intermediate certificate.

Now we need to set some correct urls. These urls are placed in the certificates that are generated and that allows browsers/applications to do some validations. We will set the following urls:

  • issuing_certificates: The endpoint on which browsers/3rd party tools can request information about the CA;
  • crl_distribution_points: The endpoint on which the Certification Revocation List is available. This is a list with revoked Certificates;
  • ocsp_servers: The url on which the OCSP service is available. OCSP Stands for Online Certificate Status Protocol and is used to determine the state of the Certificate. You can see it as a better version of the Certificate Revocation List;

Lets configure the urls:

vault write dj-wasabi/config/urls \
issuing_certificates="https://vault.service.dj-wasabi.local:8200/v1/dj-wasabi/ca" \
crl_distribution_points="https://vault.service.dj-wasabi.local:8200/v1/dj-wasabi/crl" \
ocsp_servers="https://vault.service.dj-wasabi.local:8200/v1/dj-wasabi/ocsp"
Success! Data written to: dj-wasabi/config/urls

We will come later on the blog post about this. 🙂

Before we can generate certificates, we need to create a role in Vault. With this role we map a name to a policy. This policy describes the configuration that is needed for generating the certificates. For example we have to configure on which domain we need create the certificates, can we create sub domains and most important, what is the ttl of a certificate.

vault write dj-wasabi/roles/dj-wasabi-dot-local allowed_domains="dj-wasabi.local" allow_subdomains="true" max_ttl="72h"
Success! Data written to: dj-wasabi/roles/dj-wasabi-dot-local

We are all set now, so lets create a certificate.

We specify the just created role and at minimum we have to provide the common_name (In this case small-test.dj-wasabi.local). You can find here all the options you can give when generating a certificate. The command looks like this:

vault write dj-wasabi/issue/dj-wasabi-dot-local common_name=small-test.dj-wasabi.local
Key             	Value
---             	-----
ca_chain        	[-----BEGIN CERTIFICATE-----
MIIFtTCCA52gAwIBAgIJAP2G57czbbRTMA0GCSqGSIb3DQEBCwUAMFcxCzAJBgNV
...
-----END CERTIFICATE-----
issuing_ca      	-----BEGIN CERTIFICATE-----
MIIFtTCCA52gAwIBAgIJAP2G57czbbRTMA0GCSqGSIb3DQEBCwUAMFcxCzAJBgNV
...
-----END CERTIFICATE-----
private_key     	-----BEGIN RSA PRIVATE KEY-----
MIIEpQIBAAKCAQEAsFSmpBCFN945+Chyz/YqsB2a/T73kdst4v7qm2ZLK50RxCj0
...
-----END RSA PRIVATE KEY-----
private_key_type	rsa
serial_number   	03:f2:bb:f5:27:16:81:20:76:0d:91:6f:fd:10:05:2d:a6:e1:59:e3

The command provides a lot of information and I have removed some of it to not full a whole page with unreadable data. It provides you all the data you’ll need to create a service that needs ssl certificates. As you see, it provides the certificate and the private_key, but also the ca_chain.

API

Lets generate a SSL certificate via the API.

curl -XPOST -k -H 'X-Vault-Token: <_my_root_token_>' \
-d '{"common_name": "blog.dj-wasabi.local"}' \
https://vault.service.dj-wasabi.local:8200/v1/dj-wasabi/issue/dj-wasabi-dot-local

We do an POST, and as a minimum we only provide the common_name (In this case blog.dj-wasabi.local). We use the X-Vault-Token which in my case is the ROOT Token as a header and we post it to the url https://vault.service.dj-wasabi.local:8200/v1/dj-wasabi/issue/dj-wasabi-dot-local url. If you remember, the dj-wasabi-dot-local is the name of the role, so this role has the correct ttl etc.

Lets execute it and once the certificate is created, a lot of output is returned in json format:

curl -XPOST -k -H 'X-Vault-Token: <_my_root_token_>' \
-d '{"common_name": "blog.dj-wasabi.local"}' \
https://vault.service.dj-wasabi.local:8200/v1/dj-wasabi/issue/dj-wasabi-dot-local
{"request_id":"e1d0f686-d0d8-d1d8-d7ab-428c7322229b","lease_id":"","renewable":false,"lease_duration":0,"data":{"ca_chain":["-----BEGIN CERTIFICATE-----asas-----END CERTIFICATE-----","-----BEGIN CERTIFICATE----asas------END CERTIFICATE-----"],"certificate":"-----BEGIN CERTIFICATE-----asas-----END CERTIFICATE-----","issuing_ca":"-----BEGIN CERTIFICATE-----asas-----END CERTIFICATE-----","private_key":"-----BEGIN RSA PRIVATE KEY-----asas-----END RSA PRIVATE KEY-----","private_key_type":"rsa","serial_number":"11:42:ba:66:94:b4:c9:5c:e5:1a:77:da:76:2e:57:5d:b5:64:f5:c3"},"wrap_info":null,"warnings":null,"auth":null}

Again I removed a lot of unreadable data from the example. Again you’ll see the private_key, certificate and the ca_chain which can be used with a service like nginx.

Lets do an overview of all certificates stored in our Vault:

curl -XGET -H 'X-Vault-Token: <_my_root_token_>' \
--request LIST https://vault.service.dj-wasabi.local:8200/v1/dj-wasabi/certs 
{"request_id":"fb5e7060-0d02-211a-ae25-50507a334706","lease_id":"","renewable":false,"lease_duration":0,"data":{"keys":["03-f2-bb-f5-27-16-81-20-76-0d-91-6f-fd-10-05-2d-a6-e1-59-e3","11-42-ba-66-94-b4-c9-5c-e5-1a-77-da-76-2e-57-5d-b5-64-f5-c3"]},"wrap_info":null,"warnings":null,"auth":null}

We see that there are 2 certificates stored in the Vault, the “keys” has 2 values. These keys are the Serial Numbers of the certificates. We have to use this Serial Number if we want to revoke it or we just want to get the certificate. An example of getting the certificate:

curl -XGET -H 'X-Vault-Token: df80e726-d3f0-8344-3782-fec19fe7a745' \
https://vault.service.dj-wasabi.local:8200/v1/dj-wasabi/cert/11-42-ba-66-94-b4-c9-5c-e5-1a-77-da-76-2e-57-5d-b5-64-f5-c3
{"request_id":"ae6e63f9-c04e-ac4c-d8a8-254347284771","lease_id":"","renewable":false,"lease_duration":0,"data":{"certificate":"-----BEGIN CERTIFICATE-----asasas-----END CERTIFICATE-----\n","revocation_time":0},"wrap_info":null,"warnings":null,"auth":null}

Again I removed some data from the example. You can only get the certificate, not the private key. I’ve copied the contents of the certificate in a file called blog.dj-wasabi.local.crt on my Mac, so when I run the openssl x509 command, it will show some information about this certificate:

openssl x509 -in blog.dj-wasabi.local.crt -noout -text
Certificate:
    Data:
        Version: 3 (0x2)
        Serial Number:
            11:42:ba:66:94:b4:c9:5c:e5:1a:77:da:76:2e:57:5d:b5:64:f5:c3
    Signature Algorithm: sha256WithRSAEncryption
        Issuer: C=NL, ST=Utrecht, O=dj-wasabi, OU=Vault CA, CN=dj-wasabi.local/emailAddress=ikben@werner-dijkerman.nl
        Validity
            Not Before: Aug 23 16:51:36 2017 GMT
            Not After : Aug 26 16:52:05 2017 GMT
        Subject: CN=blog.dj-wasabi.local
 ...
            Authority Information Access: 
                OCSP - URI:https://vault.service.dj-wasabi.local:8200/v1/dj-wasabi/ocsp
                CA Issuers - URI:https://vault.service.dj-wasabi.local:8200/v1/dj-wasabi/ca

            X509v3 Subject Alternative Name: 
                DNS:blog.dj-wasabi.local
            X509v3 CRL Distribution Points: 

                Full Name:
                  URI:https://vault.service.dj-wasabi.local:8200/v1/dj-wasabi/crl
 ...

The output shows that the certificate is only valid (Validity) for 3 days (72 hours). If you take a look at the “Authority Information Access”, you’ll see the urls (OCSP and the CA Issuers) we have set earlier. And a little bit further we see the CRL Distribution Points, an url we also have set with the set urls command.

Keep in mind: Only during the generation of the certificate, the private key is returned. If you did loose the private key, then revoke the certificate and generate a new one.

As last command in this blogpost we do a revoke of an certificate. We have to do an POST and sent the serial_number to the revoke endpoint.

curl -XPOST -k -H 'X-Vault-Token: <_my_root_token_>' \
-d '{"serial_number":"03-f2-bb-f5-27-16-81-20-76-0d-91-6f-fd-10-05-2d-a6-e1-59-e3"}' \
https://vault.service.dj-wasabi.local:8200/v1/dj-wasabi/revoke
{"request_id":"ea8a7132-231f-7075-f42b-f81b272cc9cd","lease_id":"","renewable":false,"lease_duration":0,"data":{"revocation_time":1503506236,"revocation_time_rfc3339":"2017-08-23T16:37:16.755130614Z"},"wrap_info":null,"warnings":null,"auth":null}

It returns a json output with a key named revocation_time. This is the time since epoch when the certificate is revoked, 0 if the certificate isn’t revoked.

So, that was it! Have fun!

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Setting up a secure Vault with a Consul backend

vault_logo

With this blogpost we continue working with a secure Consul environment: We are configuring a secure Vault setup with Consul as backend. YMMV, but this is what I needed to configure to make it work.

Environment

We should have an working Consul Cluster environment. If you don’t have one, please take a look at here for creating one. With this blogpost we expect a secure Consul cluster with SSL certificates and using ACL’s.

In this blogpost we make use of the wdijkerman/vault container. This container is created by myself and is running Vault (At moment of writing release 0.6.4) on Alpine (running on 3.5). Vault is running as user ‘vault’ and the container can be configured to use SSL certificates.

prerequisites

We have to create SSL certificates for the vault service. In this blogpost we use the domain ‘dj-wasabi.local’, as Consul is already running with this domain configuration so we have to create ssl certificates for the FQDN: ‘vault.service.dj-wasabi.local’.

On my host where my OpenSSL CA configuration is stored, I execute the following commands:

openssl genrsa -out private/vault.service.dj-wasabi.local.key 4096

Generate the key.

openssl req -new -extensions usr_cert -sha256 -subj "/C=NL/ST=Utrecht/L=Nieuwegin/O=dj-wasabi/CN=vault.service.dj-wasabi.local" -key private/vault.service.dj-wasabi.local.key -out csr/vault.service.dj-wasabi.local.csr

Create a signing request file and then sign it with the CA.

openssl ca -batch -config /etc/pki/tls/openssl.cnf -notext -in csr/vault.service.dj-wasabi.local.csr -out certs/vault.service.dj-wasabi.local.crt

We copy the ‘vault.service.dj-wasabi.local.key’, ‘vault.service.dj-wasabi.local.crt’ and the caroot certificate file to the hosts which will be running the Vault container into the directory /data/vault/ssl. Hashicorp advises to run vault on hosts where Consul Agents are running, not Consul Servers. This has probably todo with that for most use cases they see is that Consul is part of large networks and thus the servers will handle a lot of request (High load). As the Consul Servers will be very busy, it would then be wise to not run anything else on those servers.

But this is my own versy small environment (With 10 machines) so I will run Vault on the hosts running the Consul Server.

ACL

Before we do anything on these hosts, we create a ACL in Consul. We have to make sure that Vault can create keys in the key/value store and we have to allow that Vault may create a service in Consul named vault.

So our (Client) ACL will look like this:

key "vault/" {
  policy = "write"
}
service "vault" {
  policy = "write"
}

We use this in the ui on the Consul Server and create the ACL. In my case, the ACL is created with id ’94c507b4-6be8-9132-ea15-3fc5b196ea29′. This ID is needed later on when we configure Vault. Also check your ACL for the ‘Anonymous token’. Please make sure you have set the following rule if the Consul default policy is set to deny:

service "vault" {
  policy = "read"
}

With this, we make sure the service is resolvable via dns. In my case this is for ‘vault.service.dj-wasabi.local’.

Configuration

We have to configure the vault docker container. We have to create a directory that will be mounted in the container. First we have to create an user on the host and then we create the directory: /data/vault/config and own it to the just created user.

useradd -u 994 vault
mkdir /data/vault/config
chown vault:vault /data/vault/config

The container is using a user named vault and has UID 994 and we have to make sure that everything is in sync with names and id. Now we create a config.hcl file in the earlier mentioned directory:

backend "consul" {
  address = "vserver-202.dc1.dj-wasabi.local:8500"
  check_timeout = "5s"
  path = "vault/"
  token = "94c507b4-6be8-9132-ea15-3fc5b196ea29"
  scheme = "https"
  tls_skip_verify = 0
  tls_key_file = "/vault/ssl/vault.service.dj-wasabi.local.key"
  tls_cert_file = "/vault/ssl/vault.service.dj-wasabi.local.crt”
  tls_ca_file = "/vault/ssl/dj-wasabi.local.pem"
}

listener "tcp" {
  address = "0.0.0.0:8200"
  tls_disable = 0
  tls_key_file = "/vault/ssl/vault.service.dj-wasabi.local.key"
  tls_cert_file = "/vault/ssl/vault.service.dj-wasabi.local.crt"
  cluster_address = "0.0.0.0:8201"
}

disable_mlock = false

First we configure a backend for Vault. As we use Consul, we use the Consul backend. Because the Consul is running on https and is using certificates, we have to use the fqdn of the Consul node as the address (same as how we did in configuring Registratror in this post). We also have to configure the options ‘tls_key_file’, ‘tls_cert_file’ and ‘tls_ca_file’, these are the ssl certificates needed for accessing the secure Consul via SSL. Because of this, we have to set the ‘scheme’ to ‘https’ and we have to specify the token for the ACL we created earlier and add the value to the the token option.

Next we configure the listener for Vault. We configure the listener that it listens on all ips on port 8200. We also make sure we configure the earlier created SSL certificates by using them in the ‘tls_key_file’ and ‘tls_cert_file’ options.

The last option is to make sure that Vault can not swap data to the local disk.

Starting Vault

Now we are ready to start the docker container. We use the following command for this:

docker run -d -h vserver-202 --name vault \
--dns=172.17.0.2 --dns-search=service.dj-wasabi.local \
--cap-add IPC_LOCK -p 8200:8200 -p 8201:8201 \
-v /data/vault/ssl:/vault/ssl:ro \
-e VAULT_ADDR=https://vault.service.dj-wasabi.local:8200 \
-e VAULT_CLUSTER_ADDR=https://192.168.1.202:8200 \
-e VAULT_REDIRECT_ADDR=https://192.168.1.202:8200 \
-e VAULT_ADVERTISE_ADDR=https://192.168.1.202:8200 \
-e VAULT_CACERT=/vault/ssl/dj-wasabi.local.pem \
wdijkerman/vault

We have the SSL certificates stored in the /data/vault/ssl and we mount these as read only on /vault/ssl. With the VAULT_ADDR we specifiy on which url the vault service is available on, this is the url which Consul provides like any other server. With the VAULT_CACERT we specify on which location the CA Certificate file of our domain. The other 3 environment variables are needed for a High Available Vault environment and is to make sure how other vault instances can contact it.

When Vault is started, we will see something like this with the docker logs vault command:

==> Vault server configuration:

Backend: consul (HA available)
Cgo: disabled
Cluster Address: https://192.168.1.202:8200
Listener 1: tcp (addr: "0.0.0.0:8200", cluster address: "0.0.0.0:8201", tls: "enabled")
Log Level: info
Mlock: supported: true, enabled: true
Redirect Address: https://192.168.1.202:8200
Version: Vault v0.6.4
Version Sha: f4adc7fa960ed8e828f94bc6785bcdbae8d1b263

==> Vault server started! Log data will stream in below:

But where are not done yet. When Vault is started, it is in a sealed state and because this is the first vault in the cluster we have to initialise it to. Also when you check the ui of Consul, you’ll see that the vault is in an error state. Why? When Vault starts, it automatically creates a service in Consul and add health checks. These health checks will check if a vault instance is sealed or not.

Initialise

As vault is running in the container, we open a terminal to the container:

docker exec -it vault bash

Now we have a bash shell running and we going to initialise vault. First we have to make sure we set the ‘VAULT_ADDR’ to this container, by executing the following command:

export VAULT_ADDR='https://127.0.0.1:8200'

Every time we want to do something with the vault instance, we have to set the ‘VAULT_ADDR’ to localhost. If we won’t do that, we will send the commands directly against the cluster.

As this is the first vault instance in the environment, we have to initialise it and we do that by executing the following command:

vault init -tls-skip-verify
Unseal Key 1: hemsIyJD+KQSWtKp0fQ0r109fOv8TUBnugGUKVl5zjAB
Unseal Key 2: lIiIaKI1F6pJ11Jw/g1CiLyZurpfhCM9AYIylrG/SKUC
Unseal Key 3: 298bn4H8bLbJRsPASOl3R+RPuDKIt6i5fYzqxQ3wL4ED
Unseal Key 4: W4RUiOU3IzQSZ8GD2z8jBEg2wK/q17ldr3zJipFjzKQE
Unseal Key 5: FNPHf8b+WCiS9lAzbdsWyxDgwic95DLZ03IR2S0sq4AF
Initial Root Token: ed220674-24da-d446-375d-bbd0334bcb31

Vault initialized with 5 keys and a key threshold of 3. Please
securely distribute the above keys. When the Vault is re-sealed,
restarted, or stopped, you must provide at least 3 of these keys
to unseal it again.

Vault does not store the master key. Without at least 3 keys,
your Vault will remain permanently sealed.

As we set the ‘VAULT_ADDR’ to ‘https://127.0.0.1:8200&#8217;, we have to add the ‘-tls-skip-verify’ option to the vault command. If we don’t do that, it will complain the it can not validate the certificate that matches the configured url ‘vault.service.dj-wasabi.local.

After executing the command, we see some output appear. This output is very important and needs to be saved somewhere on a secure location. The output provides us 5 unseal keys and the root token. Every time a vault instance is (re)started, the instance will be in a sealed state and needs to be unsealed. 3 of the 5 tokens needs to be used when you need to unseal a vault instance.

bash-4.3$ vault unseal -tls-skip-verify
Key (will be hidden):
Sealed: true
Key Shares: 5
Key Threshold: 3
Unseal Progress: 1
bash-4.3$ vault unseal -tls-skip-verify
Key (will be hidden):
Sealed: true
Key Shares: 5
Key Threshold: 3
Unseal Progress: 2
bash-4.3$ vault unseal -tls-skip-verify
Key (will be hidden):
Sealed: false
Key Shares: 5
Key Threshold: 3
Unseal Progress: 0

We have executed 3 times the unseal command and now this Vault instance is unsealed. You can see the ‘Unseal Progress’ changing after we enter an unseal key. We can verify that state of the vault instance by executing the vault status command:

bash-4.3$ vault status -tls-skip-verify
Sealed: false
Key Shares: 5
Key Threshold: 3
Unseal Progress: 0
Version: 0.6.4
Cluster Name: vault-cluster-7e01e371
Cluster ID: b9446acf-4551-e4c2-fa5f-03bd1bcf872f

High-Availability Enabled: true
Mode: active
Leader: https://192.168.1.202:8200

We see that this vault instance is not sealed and that the mode of this node is active. You can also see that the leader of the vault instance is in my case the current host. (Not strange as this is the first Vault instance of the environment.) If we want to add a 2nd and more, we have to execute the same commands as before. With the exception of the vault init command, as we already have an initialised environment.

As we are still logged in on the node, lets create a simple entry.

bash-4.3$ export VAULT_TOKEN=ed220674-24da-d446-375d-bbd0334bcb31
bash-4.3$ vault write secret/password value=secret
Success! Data written to: secret/password

We first set the ‘VAULT_TOKEN’ variable, this value of this variable is the value of the ‘Initial root token’. After that, we created a simple entry in the database. Key ‘secret/password’ is created and had the value ‘secret’.

It took some time to investigate how to setup a High Available Vault environment with Consul, not much information can be found on the internet. So maybe this page will help you setting one up yourself. If you do have improvements please let me know.